Letters to the Editor for Wednesday, May 1

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionPray for solutions to current problemsI was 9 years old when Pearl Harbor was attacked, and World War II began. My four cousins, living next door, left to fight in the war. It was a sad time for me. My two older sisters, worked at Woolworth’s and saved enough money to purchase a radio/phonograph player, which supplied us with much pleasure. I remember our family, sitting around the radio, listening to Kate Smith singing “God Bless America.” Even at my age, it sent chills down my spine. The enemy threatened Kate Smith’s life if she continued singing. However, she was not deterred and bravely continued. I read recently that in the 1930s, Kate Smith sang racist songs and was labeled a racist. However, I never heard one of those songs on our radio. I am sure,what is considered racist today was not in the ‘30s, or ‘40s. It was a different era, and people were not educated about racism.Because of this finding, the New York Yankees decided to stop playing “God Bless America” after the seventh inning. A shame indeed!Instead of spending time searching for racism in our history, we should spend time praying for the disasters that happen almost daily. We can start by praying for the resurrection of the Notre Dame Cathedral and the hundreds of Christian lives lost in Sri Lanka’s Easter Sunday massacre.Finally, I end by saying “God Bless Kate Smith” and “God Bless America.”Vince AlescioClifton Park Scotia must control spending, taxesIt was sad to watch the Scotia Village Board break the tax cap by raising taxes over the state-mandated limit while passing the village budget. This is at least the third time the village has broken through the cap in recent years.Worse yet, they blew through even more of the village savings account to help try to meet their obligations. This tax increase doesn’t even include the increase yet to come when the village trustees ask us to pay for a new firehouse. Higher taxes, higher rents and lower property values for village residents are a reality for the foreseeable future at this rate of spending.This fiscal crisis in the village started years ago under the tax-and-spend policies from the Democrat-controlled village board.They need to tighten their belt, preserve our services and stay under the tax cap. We village residents can’t afford tax increases every year and we can’t afford to have a Democratic one-party rule either.Maria PetersonScotiaMore from The Daily Gazette:Cuomo calls for clarity on administering vaccineFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristslast_img read more

Keep it in the family

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Offices Upward trend for uptown rents

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East meets west

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If you want to invest wisely, avoid offices

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The laws of attraction

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Fortress takes control of outsourcing firm Mapeley

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Trump plans Southeast Asia summit in Las Vegas: Pompeo

first_imgUS President Donald Trump has invited Southeast Asian leaders to meet next month in Las Vegas, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said Tuesday, after a summit last year was scrapped.Pompeo confirmed the date when asked at a news conference whether fears over the coronavirus outbreak would delay the summit with members of the 10-nation Association of Southeast Asian Nations.”The ASEAN summit is still, we’re working our way through it for … the second weekend in March in Las Vegas,” Pompeo said. Diplomats said that the summit would involve Trump and is scheduled to take place on March 12 in the desert gambling haven.The United States began sounding out Southeast Asian leaders about visiting after Chile canceled a Pacific Rim summit scheduled for November in the wake of major demonstrations.Trump had likewise skipped an ASEAN summit and parallel East Asia Summit last year in Bangkok.He instead sent his national security advisor, Robert O’Brien, in the lowest-level participation ever by the United States in the East Asia Summit. Most ASEAN leaders snubbed a meeting with O’Brien, sending junior officials who were of more parallel rank.The low-level presence in Bangkok came after years of US efforts to show that the United States is committed to Asia in the face of a rising China.In Bangkok, O’Brien renewed the US call for freedom of navigation and accused China of using “intimidation” to stop ASEAN nations from exploiting resources in the South China Sea.center_img Topics :last_img read more

Greece reports first coronavirus case

first_imgThe Greek government on Tuesday said a shutdown of some public areas and travel restrictions would be activated in case of a mass outbreak.The measures, contained in a government decree, include temporary travel bans to and from countries with a large number of infections and enable beds to be requisitioned in hotels and private clinics.The decree also foresees the temporary closure of “indoor public gathering areas” such as schools, places of worship, cinemas, theatres, sports halls and businesses.”We are ready to do whatever is necessary to protect public health,” government spokesman Stelios Petsas told reporters. Greece’s health ministry has earmarked 13 hospitals nationwide to handle virus cases.A health ministry spokesman earlier this week noted that owing to the virus’ long gestation period, health checks at ports and airports had only minor chances of success.On Monday, the Greek Olympic Committee said it had discussed alternative plans for the Olympic Flame lighting ceremony for the Tokyo 2020 Games in case of a virus outbreak.The flame for the Tokyo 2020 Olympics is scheduled to be lit on March 12 at the site of ancient Olympia and, following a torch relay on Greek soil, will be handed to the Tokyo organizers at a ceremony on March 19 at the Panathenaic Stadium in Athens. Topics :center_img Greece on Wednesday reported its first coronavirus case, a woman who had recently traveled to northern Italy.A health ministry spokesman said the 38-year-old woman was in a Thessaloniki hospital and in good condition.The announcement comes as the COVID-19 virus continues to surge in Italy, making it the hardest-hit country in Europe.  last_img read more

Premier League clubs face backlash as FIFA urges action

first_imgEven the average salary for a Premier League footballer is more than £3 million a year, according to the 2019 Global Sports Salaries Survey.European champions Liverpool, who recorded pre-tax profits of £42 million in February, announced their decision to furlough some non-playing staff on Saturday, becoming the fifth Premier League club to do so.The controversial move comes with no sign of a deal between Premier League clubs and players’ representatives on a pay cut. Oliver Dowden, a culture and sports minister, writing in the Daily Telegraph, said people had a right to expect leadership from football. Premier League clubs are facing a backlash after Liverpool tapped into public funds during the coronavirus pandemic while FIFA on Monday urged players and clubs to reach agreement over wage reductions.English top-flight clubs, among the wealthiest in the world, have come under intense scrutiny, with government ministers warning bosses and players they should “think carefully” over their next moves.The highest-paid Premier League players such as Manchester United goalkeeper David de Gea and Manchester City midfielder Kevin De Bruyne command eye-watering salaries, reportedly nearing £20 million ($25 million, 23 million euros) a year. “Clubs, players and owners should be thinking very carefully about their next steps,” he said.”Leaving the public purse to pick up the cost of furloughing low-paid workers, while players earn millions and billionaire owners go untouched is something I know the public will rightly take a very dim view of.”Former Liverpool stars Jamie Carragher and Stan Collymore strongly criticized the move by the Premier League leaders.Under the scheme, the British government pays 80 percent of wages. Liverpool said they would top up the remaining 20 percent.Liverpool fan group Spirit of Shankly initially supported the move but later wrote to the club expressing concern at the negative reaction.American-owned Liverpool’s opponents in last year’s Champions League final, Tottenham, owned by billionaire Joe Lewis, have also opted for the furlough option, along with Newcastle, Norwich and Bournemouth.Manchester City, bankrolled by Abu Dhabi’s Sheikh Mansour, said they would not be using the government’s job retention scheme, with Manchester United reportedly set to follow their example.FIFA on Monday urged clubs and players to reach agreement on taking wage reductions in order to protect clubs who are suffering financial damage, sources at world football’s governing body said.It also recommended that players’ contracts be extended until the end of the interrupted football seasons and that the transfer window should not open until that time.The call from FIFA comes as Premier League clubs are locked in talks with players and their representatives about taking pay cuts.The English top-flight is lagging behind other European leagues. In Spain, Barcelona and Atletico Madrid players have agreed to pay cuts of 70 percent.Many politicians have urged action from the Premier League and in a poll conducted by YouGov last week, 92 percent of respondents said they backed a pay cut.But some leading players resent the political pressure. Former England captain Wayne Rooney has criticized the government and the Premier League for placing footballers in a “no-win” situation.Rooney questioned the wisdom of the Premier League in preempting behind-the-scenes talks involving players with its own proposals for sweeping reductions.”In my opinion it is now a no-win situation,” he said in a newspaper column. “Whatever way you look at it, we’re easy targets.”With no collective agreement in sight, the BBC said on Monday that Premier League players were set to start negotiations on a club-by-club basis over proposed wage cuts.Burnley manager Sean Dyche said footballers deserved more credit for the work they do to help good causes — efforts that, he said, are often little publicized.”I have seen footballers do so many good things, so many things financially, so many things with time, care effort and attention,” he told Talksport radio.In the latest sign of the financial crisis as a result of the coronavirus, England manager Gareth Southgate and the Football Association’s top earners have agreed to take wage cuts of up to 30 percent.Topics :last_img read more