Canada finishes probe of 9th BSE case

first_img The bull was born on the farm, and its birth and feed cohort consisted of 593 animals. Investigators had traced 518 of the cohort so far and hoped to finish tracing the remaining 75 animals by the end of March. Fifty-seven of the animals remaining on the farm were under quarantine until officials decide when to destroy them, the report said. Their carcasses will be excluded from the food and feed chains. Apr 4, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – Canada recently released a report on the investigation of its ninth case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), or mad cow disease, the first case of 2007. The animal’s carcass was transferred to the Alberta Agriculture and Food laboratory, where it was burned. The report said none of it entered the human food supply or animal feed chain. Canadian officials said the latest BSE case is not unexpected and still reflects an extremely low level of BSE in the country. Of 150,000 cattle tested since 2003, only 9 have tested positive for BSE, the report noted. In a study of the feed the animal was exposed to on the farm, officials found no direct link between specific products or production practices that carried a risk of cross-contamination. However, they found that the bull was exposed to feed from facilities that have handled material banned from cattle feed.center_img The United States banned imports of Canadian cattle and beef after Canada’s first BSE case in May 2003. The border was reopened to boneless beef from young cattle a few months later, but live cattle were banned until July 2005, when officials reopened the border to cattle intended for slaughter before reaching 30 months of age. The agency said the bull died sometime between Jan 20 and 22 after becoming emaciated over the course of the winter. A private veterinarian determined the bull met the inclusion criteria for Canada’s National BSE Surveillance Program, and forwarded brain samples for testing. BSE was confirmed on Feb 7 at the National BSE Reference Laboratory in Lethbridge, Alberta. The case was in a 79-month-old bull from an Alberta beef farm, according to an investigation report released Mar 26 by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). The bull was born in 2000, about 3 years after Canada banned the use of cattle protein in feed for cattle and other ruminants in 1997. These facilities were supplied by the same rendering plant that has been identified in previous BSE probes, the report said. It also said investigators could not rule out the possibility of cross-contamination when the feed was transported.last_img read more

Indonesia has another avian flu case

first_imgOct 11, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – Indonesian officials have reported an H5N1 avian influenza case in a 12-year-old boy in the Jakarta area, raising the country’s human case count to 109, according to news services.The boy is from the Jakarta suburb of Tangerang and is being treated in a Jakarta hospital, said Muhammad Nadirin, a spokesman for the health ministry’s avian flu center, according to a Reuters report published today.Nadirin said it was not clear how the boy was exposed to the virus, but some chickens had died in his neighborhood, according to the story.Eighty-seven of Indonesia’s H5N1 cases have been fatal, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). The WHO’s global count, which does not yet include the new Indonesian case, stands at 330 cases with 202 deaths.Meanwhile, five people with suspected avian flu in Indonesia’s North Sumatra province tested negative for the H5N1 virus, according to an Agence France-Presse (AFP) report published yesterday. The report quoted a spokesman named Momo at the avian flu information center.The five were among seven people from the same village who were admitted to a hospital in Medan, the provincial capital, Oct 6, AFP reported. Momo said he had no information on the other two patients.An earlier report from Antara, Indonesia’s national news agency, had said 8 people were hospitalized with suspected avian flu in Medan on Oct 7, including a pregnant woman and a 3-year-old.In other developments, H5N1 cropped up again in poultry in southern Vietnam this week after a 2-month absence, according to a Reuters report today.The Agriculture Ministry said ducks from a farm in the Mekong Delta’s Tra Vinh province tested positive for the virus, according to Reuters. Testing was done after five birds in an unvaccinated flock of 300 died. The rest of the ducks have since been destroyed by animal-health workers, the story said.Agriculture Minister Cao Duc Phat urged veterinary authorities this week to step up poultry vaccinations, Reuters reported. He said avian flu would soon reemerge among unvaccinated birds, especially as the weather cools in northern Vietnam.last_img read more

Jeremy Woolfe: MiFID II crystal ball still clouded over

first_imgBut other commentators are less optimistic on the clearance by Brussels of the supplementary rules. One large pension fund investor reports that it would not be surprised to see the Commission publish the RTSs as late as October. Another source comes up with a similar timing, “bearing in mind past experience”. Such is sensitivity in the field that both authorities prefer not to be identified.On top of an October estimate, even if further delay of 3-6 months were required for clearance by the Parliament and Council prior to publication in the Official Journal, there does still appear to be time for compliance procedures to be effected. Michael Lewis, MiFID expert at law firm Pinsent Masons, puts the time needed for IT sections to build, implement and test their compliance systems to be in the order of nine months. The work would include coverage of transaction reporting, which would have to be done electronically, he tells IPE.But is there any need to worry about the time factor? “Hard to say,” says Lewis. “It depends on what comes out of ESMA and how substantial the delegated acts are. It is very difficult to crystal ball at this stage.” He does find the present one-year implementation delay to be much welcome in the investor sector.While many of the 28 RTS articles will not require IT system development, Lewis notes that fund managers could well face having to build IT systems to cope with so-called “appropriateness”. He foresees the possibility of an expansion of scope from what exists under MiFID I. He expects that smaller pension funds will have to buy in the necessary IT development for consultancies. It remains to be seen whether such costs could be absorbed internally or passed on to the pension beneficiaries.In the meantime, the issue of derivatives trade transparency, which first arose last year, has been highlighted by PensionsEurope. The institution states that, under current MiFID rules, as drafted by ESMA, pension funds could be discouraged, by the expense, from hedging inflation or interest-rate risk against long-dated liabilities. The liquidity definition for many derivatives sub-classes is of fewer than 10 trades taking place during a one-day period, it adds. It comments that ESMA mis-designated illiquid derivatives sub-classes as liquid. The trades-per-day threshold for determining the liquidity of derivatives sub-classes should be set cautiously. PensionsEurope’s Ursula Bordas questions whether the authority has made a mistake in this matter, which she judges to be not less important than the compliance-timing matter.Taking a similar line on clearing venue calibration of liquidity, Roger Cogan, head of European public policy at the International Swaps and Derivatives Association, says: “We remain concerned that 10 trades per day – one trade per hour – is a very low bar for designating derivatives as liquid for the purpose of applying trade transparency requirements.” At the time of writing, the Commission declined to comment on the matter but has been under pressure from the US authorities to come into line with them on derivatives clearance. Estimates for the publication of the ‘delegated acts’ rules for MiFID II remain unclear, Jeremy Woolfe writesEstimates for when the European Commission will publish the ‘delegated acts’ rules for the Markets in Financial Instruments Directive (MiFID II) remain unclear. Indications are that there will be an adequate interval for the IT-compliance exercise by portfolio managers to meet the new implementation date of 3 January 2018.The most optimistic report on the streets of Brussels has it that the European Commission will have completed its work on MiFID’s Regulatory Technical Standards (RTS) before the summer holiday. This would leave a generous margin of time for fund managers to deliver their compliance work on time. Unsurprisingly, when challenged on this timing, the Commission avoids fixing on a firm date.However, it does state: “We are working to finalise the rest of the level II package in the coming months. We will adopt and send RTS for scrutiny [by the Parliament and Council] as soon as they are ready (rather than sending them together).” Cautious to the last, the Commission also covers itself by adding: “At this stage, there is no legal deadline by which the Paris-based European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) has to propose amended drafts”.last_img read more