Montrealers gather outside Olympic Stadium to welcome asylumseekers from US

first_imgMONTREAL – Several hundred people shouted “refugees welcome!” in Creole as they gathered outside Montreal’s Olympic Stadium on Sunday to show support for the waves of asylum-seekers crossing the border from the United States.Members of the group stood on a hill near the entrance to the stadium, waving signs and balloons and chanting messages of welcome.“We are here with them, to support them and to help them establish themselves,” organizer Serge Bouchereau told the crowd through a megaphone.“This is a vast, rich country that can welcome many, many people who are in bad situations and can’t stay in their own countries.”The Olympic Stadium is one of several venues that has been transformed into a temporary shelter to accommodate some of the refugee-claimants, whose numbers have soared in recent weeks.The City of Montreal says between 250 and 300 people are now crossing the Canada-United States border to seek asylum every day, up from 50 per day in the first half of July.Many of those crossing the border, like 32-year-old Adline Tidas, are of Haitian descent.In the United States, the Trump administration is considering ending a program that granted Haitians so-called “temporary protected status” following the massive earthquake that struck Haiti in 2010.Tidas said she had been living in Ft. Lauderdale since 2009 but left the United States last week because she feared being sent back to her home country.“The government gave an extension of eight months, and I don’t want to go back to Haiti,” she said in an interview near the stadium.She said conditions in the shelter were good and she was feeling optimistic about her future.“(Canada) looks like a good place, I’m supposed to be here,” she said.“Right now, anything I can do to work, I will do it. But my dream is, I want to be a nurse — to help people because people helped me.”Several in the crowd said they had come to Canada as immigrants themselves and wanted to show their support for the newcomers.“I have a standard of living that is very high because this country accepted me, and I wish it for others as well,” said 22-year-old Alexis Audoin, who was born in France.The event was organized by Solidarity across borders and the Non-status action committee, both of which are calling for open borders and the regularization of undocumented immigrants.A separate counter-demonstration had been organized to protest the arrival of the asylum-seekers, but organizers announced on Saturday that it had been cancelled.last_img read more

Don’t take Royals lightly: SRH coach

first_imgJaipur: Sunrisers Hyderabad coach Tom Moody on Friday cautioned his team against taking Rajasthan Royals lightly in the absence of top players such as Jos Buttler and Ben Stokes in the opposition ranks. Hoping to inch closer to securing a playoff berth, Sunrisers Hyderabad will take on Rajasthan Royals in the Indian Premier League here on Saturday. “I wouldn’t say that they are a weakened side because if I lose players it also presents opportunities to those who are hungry. You cannot underestimating your opponent. The fringe players only need a lucky break to shine,” Moody said at the pre-match press conference. Also Read – We will push hard for Kabaddi”s inclusion in 2024 Olympics: RijijuThe former Australian all-rounder added: “Therefore, regardless of who has come and who has gone in Rajasthan’s line- up, we know that they are a dangerous side, and particularly at home.” SRH are placed fourth in the standings with five wins and as many losses, giving them 10 points, while the hosts are stuttering at the seventh position after seven defeats in 11 outings. Moody said: “It is a very important game for both teams, given that the middle of the table is very crowded. It is an opportunity for us to break away from that middle. Also Read – Djokovic to debut against Shapovalov at Shanghai Masters”We have four games left and have to win majority of those, most of the teams in the middle are in that position. We know that Rajasthan are coming off a win but they are also coming from back-to-back games, had a travel day today and have lost a few players to World Cup commitments.” He said the departure of Jonny Bairstow for England has opened the door for people like Martin Guptill. “Warner and Barstow have been performing well. But when the door closes, another one opens. It’s an opportunity for someone else to step in that batting position. “We haven’t finalised the eleven, whether Guptill plays or not is undecided. “For the past four weeks, he has been practicing on all sorts of surfaces at nets which are more often not as good as surfaces which are presented out in the middle. “He is prepared for any surface. He has prepared and preparing for that opportunity.”last_img read more

I’m successful because Kohli gave me freedom to attack: Kuldeep

first_imgKolkata: Star India wrist spinner Kuldeep Yadav believes he wouldn’t have been successful at the world stage had it not been for skipper Virat Kohli, who gave him the freedom to attack. “You need a skipper who backs you and believes in your ability to shine on the big stage. You think we could have been so successful if Kohli bhai had not given us the freedom to attack? I don’t think so,” Kuldeep told PTI in an interview. Kuldeep, who played for Kolkata Knight Riders, was badly let down by the batting friendly conditions at Eden Gardens in this year’s IPL as he returned with just four wickets from nine matches before being dropped by his franchise in the business end of the tournament. Also Read – We will push hard for Kabaddi”s inclusion in 2024 Olympics: RijijuThe 24-year-old said he is looking forward to put the IPL disappointment behind with a spectacular performance in the upcoming World Cup beginning May 30. “IPL is very different than World Cup. There are players who have done well in IPL but have struggled to make a mark for the country. I’ve matured as a bowler and by no means it will affect my performance in the World Cup,” Kuldeep said. “It’s (T20) such a format, you may have a bad day where you’re hit for runs. I’m not a magician who will do well in every match. You cannot say I will take so many wickets.” Also Read – Djokovic to debut against Shapovalov at Shanghai MastersBy his own standard, an average of 71.50 in IPL is something he would look to forget. “If I’m not getting wickets it does not mean I’m not bowling well. Now I play as a mature cricketer and think more about the team,” Kuldeep said. Kuldeep also spoke about the recent controversy about his comments on Mahendra Singh Dhoni that sometimes the former skipper “goes wrong” with his tips. “How can a youngster like me make such comments on a senior member of the side? My comments had been misinterpreted by media to create a controversy,” he said. “There is no doubt that his tips have been invaluable not only for me but for the entire team. His presence behind the stumps makes our job easy and nobody can change that fact. We wouldn’t have been half as effective without his inputs.” Andre Russell was a terror in the IPL with his batting exploits and single-handedly turned KKR’s fortunes before they failed to make the playoffs. Kuldeep said he has learnt a few tricks which he would employ against the West Indian in the World Cup.last_img read more

Craft brewers welcome move to sell beer at corner stores in Ontario

Follow @AleksSagan on Twitter.Aleksandra Sagan, The Canadian Press Ontario craft breweries are welcoming the provincial government’s move to expand beer sales to corner stores, saying the current system limits their products’ exposure to customers.“I just think it’s fantastic news,” said Scott Simmons, president of the Ontario Craft Brewers, a trade association composed of nearly 100 brewer members.Premier Doug Ford’s Progressive Conservative government tabled legislation last week that would terminate a contract with The Beer Store that was signed by the previous Liberal government. The deal allowed for beer and wine sales to be expanded to hundreds of grocery stores, but the Tories want to also allow beer in corner stores.The legislation is expected to pass Thursday, despite criticism from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the Ontario Chamber of Commerce.The way The Beer Store operates makes it difficult for smaller breweries to sell their products there and attract customers, said Todd Lewin, president of Muskoka Brewery.The foreign brewers that own Molson Coors, Labatt and Sleeman mostly own the chain, which operates more than 450 retail stores.It’s expensive to buy a listing at the store, said Lewin. He estimates it would cost more than $100,000 to sell one type of beer at all the chain’s locations. First, there’s a several-thousand-dollar listing fee and a $230 fee per store, he said. If brewers don’t sell a certain volume every six months or so, Lewin said, they lose that listing.It’s also hard for craft brewers to have their products noticed in a conventional Beer Store, he said. Many locations prevent consumers from perusing store shelves that may hold new brands to sample.As a result, craft brewer sales volumes tend to be lower at The Beer Store than at other avenues, like grocery stores, he said. Lewin, who sits on the Ontario chamber’s board of directors, supports the move to sell beer at grocery stores.Craft beer sales in the province have been suppressed with the current system, said Simmons.They account for two per cent of the sales volume at The Beer Store, according to his figures, while they make up 13 per cent of sales at LCBO stores and more than 20 per cent in many grocery banners.“It just kind of shows you what happens when we can put our fantastic products in front of consumers in a shopping environment where they can stop, browse, look at the product, pick it up, ask for some advice,” he said.The change would benefit not only craft brewers, but also consumers and taxpayers, said Simmons. Consumers will have more choice and convenience, and the move will give the economy a boost, he said.While most of the association’s members express support for corner store beer sales, Simmons said some have asked questions about distribution.Lewin, for one, wondered how a new distribution model would work to cost effectively bring the brewery’s beers to thousands of new locations.The Ontario chamber has been working out how distribution will work in this new environment, Simmons said, and has been speaking with third-party organizations.“I have no concerns whatsoever that we can’t come up with a model that will make it beneficial for our membership to have an expanded retail footprint in the province,” he said.“I wouldn’t even call it a concern. I’d call it a question mark.” read more

Annans adviser recommends longterm UN presence in postconflict Haiti

“We cannot continue, I said to the Council this morning, with the stop-start cycle that has characterized relations between the international community and Haiti,” Special Adviser Reginald Dumas told journalists after he spoke to the Security Council in a closed meeting.Since 1994, 10 separate and joint missions by the United Nations and the Organization of American States (OAS) would spend a year or two, without necessarily involving local people in their work, and there would be no continuity after the missions left, he said.During a recent 10-day visit to Haiti’s capital, Port-au-Prince, he saw that the health care, education, human rights, justice and police institutions had virtually collapsed and would require a massive and sustained effort on the part of the international community to restore, Mr. Dumas said.A long-term commitment would last for a period of not less than 20 years, he said, whether that period would be acceptable to the international community or not. He noted that Mr. Annan had suggested a commitment of 10 years “or more.”In a couple of weeks he would return to improved security in Haiti and hoped to travel into the interior by road, he said.Asked about a Caribbean Community (CARICOM) request for an investigation into how Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide came to leave the country at the beginning of the month, he said the request was first made at the special meeting of the regional body in early March and was repeated last week by the 15-member CARICOM summit that met in St. Kitts and Nevis.”Now remember that this is not an investigation by the United Nations,” he said. “It is an investigation under the auspices of the UN.”The communiqué from the CARICOM Special Meeting was sent to the Secretary-General who circulated it to General Assembly and Security Council members, but Mr. Dumas said his understanding was that this was not the same as a formal request. “As far as I know, it still remains on the table,” he added. Video of the press encounter [27mins] read more

Ohio State mens soccer wins second straight tops Cleveland State 10

The Ohio State Buckeyes and Cleveland State Vikings men’s soccer teams face off at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium Oct. 27. OSU won, 1-0. Credit: Mark Batke / Lantern photographer After going nine straight matches without a win, seven of which were coincidentally without a goal, the Ohio State men’s soccer team (4-6-5, 0-2-2) is now riding a two-game winning streak following a 1-0 victory over the Cleveland State Vikings.With a second half goal by freshman forward Danny Jensen, OSU now has five goals in its last two matches and has won back-to-back matches for the first time all season.Buckeye coach John Bluem said despite a poor first half, the team stuck with it and earned a big win Sunday.“We made the one change putting Jensen up top and bringing (junior forward) Kenny Cunningham into midfield and Danny ended up getting the goal,” he said. “A little different look there and something as little as that maybe changed it for us. They had a much more difficult time dealing with Danny than they did Kenny and that’s just how games go sometimes.”Bluem said the team’s goal moving forward is to try and be at its best heading into the Big Ten Tournament.“We’re experimenting. We’ve been forced to change our defense around a little bit and that’s worked out all right … and we’re finding that we can score goals,” he said. “(We have) a little bit of confidence, we now have a win streak for the first time this season, so I’m just happy for the guys,”Jensen’s goal came when he connected with junior midfielder Ryan Ivancic’s cross to break the deadlock.Jensen, who scored his second goal of the season, said after the match the shot was not a difficult one thanks to the help of his teammates.“Basically, I saw the ball going into an area where there’s obviously going to be a cross,” he said. “Ivancic happened to put a ball right on my head and it was a pretty easy goal. I was inside the six yard box and you just have to put those away to win the game, I’m happy it happened. I’m happy it helped our team win, we needed that win, and overall a great play on that.”Sunday‘s match was almost dead-even as OSU outshot CSU 9-8, while the Vikings held the advantage in corners 5-4.Redshirt-junior goalkeeper Alex Ivanov earned his seventh shutout in 2013 and recorded three saves on the day, putting his season total at 90.Sophomore midfielder Zach Mason said the consecutive wins were a “long time coming” and the team will be able to use them as motivation to finish the season strong.“We’re just going to try and keep the winning streak going all the way through the postseason and hopefully get a win in the Big Ten tournament, right out of the gate,” Mason said.He also mentioned that having the tournament at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium will be a big advantage and the Buckeyes plan to “defend it with (their) hearts.”The Buckeyes have five days off until they are scheduled to resume Big Ten play when No. 13 Penn State travels to Columbus Saturday. The game is set to begin at 7 p.m. read more

Rio Tinto completes first phase of Pilbara iron ore expansion

first_imgRio Tinto recently completed the first phase of the major expansion of its integrated iron ore operations in the Pilbara, celebrating the milestone on October 2 with a ceremony at Cape Lambert. The Premier of Western Australia, Colin Barnett MLA, officially opened Cape Lambert Wharf B (CLB) which will help bring the overall capacity of Rio Tinto’s Pilbara iron ore operations to 290 Mt/y, the largest iron ore operation in Australia and the second largest in the world. Rio Tinto Iron Ore chief executive Andrew Harding said: “The 290 expansion, the largest integrated mining project in Australia, has created the opportunity for Rio Tinto to deliver superior value to shareholders and customers. It is testament to our focus on value-driven growth at our low-cost operations.”He added: “We have again demonstrated our project execution performance is second to none, delivering this expansion ahead of schedule and under budget. This disciplined approach has generated greater value through capital expenditure savings of $400 million on a 100% basis, achieved mainly from our engineering and contracting strategies across this phase of the programme. By running Australia’s lowest-cost iron ore operations we will ensure the benefits continue to flow through to the bottom line.” The CLB system delivered first shipment in late August. The safe and efficient ramp-up schedule is on track to reach a full run-rate by the end of the first half of 2014. The phase two expansion of the port, rail and power infrastructure to 360 Mt/y is underway. A number of options for mine capacity growth are under evaluation including incremental tonnes from low-cost productivity improvements, expansion of existing mines and the potential development of new mines.last_img read more

EHF CL Vive Kielce with comeback wins against Chambery

It was known that the match between Vive Targi Kielce and Chambéry Savoie was important for both teams – Kielce needed 1 point to win Group C; for Chambéry it was the last chance to fight for the fourth place. The game began well for the Polish champions but after 5 decent minutes they started losing too many goals; neither offence nor defence worked properly and in 16. minute French team was leading by 7 goals. Fortunately for Kielce, its players pulled together, started catching up with the opponent and eventually took the lead right before the half time. Also Venio Losert , who replaced Sławomir Szmal in hosts’ goal, made a difference and had a few good saves. The second half was not as thrilling and changeable as the first one: Vive gained 4 or 5-goal-advantage and managed to keep it to the very end. The final result was 36:32 for Kielce. The top scorers for the Polish team were Michał Jurecki and Mateusz Jachlewski (8). This victory means that Vive Kielce will remain in the first place of Group C regardless of the result of the last match against Gorenje Velenje.TEXT: Martyna Usnarska ← Previous Story HSV demolish Partizan for first place – Schwalb: We can reach F4! Next Story → EHF Cup: Holstebro wins in Plock – Goppingen defeated in Spain! Chamberyjureckilosertszmalvive kielce read more

Réseaux sociaux 36 des Français ont un profil

first_imgRéseaux sociaux : 36% des Français ont un profilUne enquête réalisée par l’Arcep, régulateur des télécoms, révèle que plus d’un tiers des Français de plus de 12 ans sont inscrits sur un réseau social.A l’heure actuelle, si 36% des Français sont inscrits sur un réseau social, quatre cinquième de la population des 12 – 24 ans en ont déjà utilisé un. Avec sept millions de nouveaux utilisateurs, “c’est la diffusion la plus rapide d’un usage jamais mesurée par cette enquête”, indique l’Acerp.Cette explosion des réseaux sociaux relance également le débat sur la protection de la vie privée. En effet, si 91% des utilisateurs pensent que les sites Internet et les réseaux sociaux devraient permettre d’effacer à leur gré les informations personnelles mises en ligne, 94%  “s’accorde[nt]à dire que les pouvoirs publics doivent inciter davantage les sites Internet à mieux protéger la vie privée de chacun”.Le 10 décembre 2010 à 19:01 • Emmanuel Perrinlast_img read more

Rugby on the Beach Saturday at Rickys Flamingo Café

first_img Recommended for you What’s on TONIGHT in Providenciales Windvibes Watersports Tournament Returns for 9th Year Race for the Conch impresses Rowdy Gaines US Gold Medal Olympian Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 06 Nov 2015 – Beach Rugby is on this weekend at Ricky’s Flamingo Café from 11:30am. There will be matches featuring players from Provo, Grand Turk and South Caicos starting from noon. The day will include DJ music, raffle prizes, refreshments and that fantastic inflatable stadium. Beach Rugby is courtesy of the TCI Rugby Football Union, on tomorrow at Ricky’s Café. Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:beach rugby, Ricky’s Flamingo Cafelast_img

Pochettino Money not key to success

first_imgAs debate of their spending power goes on, Tottenham manager Mauricio Pochettino has downplayed the role of money in building a successful Premier League side.Despite not signing a single player in last summer’s transfer window, Spurs have fared pretty well in all competitions this season.The North London club is just six points behind Premier League leaders Liverpool, qualified for the knockout stages of the Champions League, qualified for the fourth round of the Emirates FA Cup and will face Chelsea on Wednesday night in the League Cup semifinal.“It is not my dream to have this type of money. Of course, it is going to help you, but it is not my dream,” Pochettino told Sky Sports.Kieran trippier, Mauricio Pochettino, Tottenham HotspursTrippier and Pochettino try to clear up a war of words George Patchias – September 13, 2019 The apparent war of words between Kieran Trippier and Mauricio Pochettino is thought to be nothing more than a misunderstanding.Trippier was sold by Tottenham…“People think the only way is money. But at the moment I am happy. Today the club is doing what the club need to do and I am so happy to be here helping the club and is it so clear, the project.“I can see in the future Tottenham winning trophies, I don’t know with us or without, in one year or in five years, but all the basis and foundation is for one day to start to win.“The vision for the future is for Tottenham to be one of the most exciting clubs in the world, not only England.”last_img read more

Dallas Seavey leads Iditarod pack into Cripple

first_imgDallas Seavey, pictured here arriving first into McGrath, has pushed all the way to Cripple. (Photo by Zachariah Hughes/KSKA)Dallas Seavey has pushed his team at the front of Iditarod pack into the old gold mining settlement of Cripple. 400 miles into the race, the three-time champion is joined by seven others out of Ophir, including Jeff King, Norwegian Robert Sorlie, and Noah Burmeister. With 14 dogs in harness, Dallas Seavey wins the Dorothy G. Page Halfway Award: $3,000 in gold nuggets.Download AudioThe next two days will see a shakeup in the standings as mushers leapfrog one another upon completing their 24-hour breaks in different checkpoints. Contenders Brent Sass, Nicolas Petit, and Joar Ulsom have been parked 70 miles behind in Ophir since early this morning, apparently taking their rest there.In the traditionally popular stop of Takotna, Aliy Zirkle, Pete Kaiser, and Mitch Seavey have been resting and are eligible to leave late tonight. Further back in McGrath is Wade Marrs. And after an early marathon push, Yukon Quest champion Hugh Neff finished his 24-hour layover in Nikolai and is back racing on the trail to Nome.last_img read more

Two murders occur within two hours Anchorage police say theyre unrelated

first_imgAnchorage logged its 17th and 18th homicides of the year in less than two hours Wednesday night.Listen nowOne victim, a woman, was shot in Spenard. The other, a man, was stabbed in Midtown.Police say they believe the two deaths were unrelated and – though there have been no arrests in either killing – Anchorage residents should not be alarmed.MJ Thim is a police spokesperson.“We understand their concerns, but we want to reassure that we are working to close these cases, but at this time there is no threat to the public,” Thim said.Thim says it was a little before 9 last night that someone shot the woman in the Spenard neighborhood. He says detectives think the shooting was drug related.“She was shot and struck by a vehicle fleeing the scene,” Thim said.The vehicle struck a multi-plex close by. Officers interviewed the driver, and while it was unclear if that person was connected to the shooting, Thim said the driver was released without charges.Police are withholding the woman’s name pending notification of her next of kin. Thim says investigators have no suspect information to release.Then, Thim says, shortly before 11pm, police responded to a 911 call and found a man bleeding from multiple stab wounds near Midtown.“Investigators believe that the victim and the parties involved are homeless,” Thim said. “Indications are this was an isolated incident and not random.”Thim did not give a possible motive for the stabbing and said investigators also have no suspect information to release, nor have they made any arrests.last_img read more

Alaska News Nightly Wednesday May 8 2019

first_imgHouse passes sweeping crime bill Andrew Kitchenman, KTOO – Juneau Anchorage man indicted for 2018 murder of girlfriend’s 6-year-old son After recent reports of dogs dying from getting caught in traps, the goal of the new ordinance is to further restrict the practice within the municipality. If there really is a lake monster in Alaska’s largest lake, a group of researchers using cutting edge technology this summer might have the best chance yet of finding it. Andrew Kitchenman, KTOO – Juneau An Anchorage man has been arrested nearly a year after the death of a child in his care. House Bill 49 would mark the third time the Legislature changed major provisions of the controversial criminal justice law known as Senate Bill 91. Liz Ruskin, Alaska Public Media – Washington D.C. Retired admiral Thad Allen, a former Coast Guard commandant, said the country needs to wake up to the strategic importance of the Arctic Ocean and commit more resources to it. Constitutional delegate Vic Fischer opposes Dunleavy’s amendment proposals Alaska prison riot damage estimated at $100,000 Why is the US so far behind in the Arctic? Clues emerge at congressional hearing Tazlina makes maiden voyage to Haines and Skagway Trappers and dog-owners at odds over new restrictions in Anchorage Search renewed for Iliamna Lake’s ‘monster’ with DNA testing and underwater video Jacob Resneck, CoastAlaska – Juneau Casey Grove, Alaska Public Media – Anchorage The Alaska Department of Corrections says prisoners caused an estimated $100,000 damage after taking over a wing of a maximum security prison. Thirteen years after it was first conceived, the first Alaska class ferry completed its maiden voyage up Lynn Canal. The concept and design has changed with different governors making it an odd duck in the fleet. Zachariah Hughes, Alaska Public Media – Anchorage Vic Fischer spoke to the House State Affairs Committee Tuesday, two days after his 95th birthday. He contrasted the state constitution’s language with the proposed amendments. Associated Press Casey Grove, Alaska Public Media – Anchorage Stories are posted on the APRN news page. You can subscribe to APRN’s newsfeeds via email, podcast and RSS. Follow us on Facebook at alaskapublic.org and on Twitter @AKPublicNewslast_img read more

Patnaik wishes Jaitley speedy recovery

first_imgBhubaneswar: Odisha Chief Minister Naveen Patnaik on Saturday expressed concern over hospitalisation of former Union Minister Arun Jaitley and wished him a speedy recovery. Jaitley was admitted to the Intensive Care Unit of All India Institute of Medical Sciences in New Delhi on Friday after he complained of breathlessness and restlessness. “Concerned to know about @arunjaitley ji’s hospitalisation. Wish him a quick recovery and pray for his good health and long life,” Patnaik twitted. Patnaik’s Biju Janata Dal also wished speedy recovery of Jaitley. Jaitley, a lawyer by profession, was an important part of Narendra Modi’s Cabinet during his first term as prime minister. He held Finance and Defence portfolios, and often acted as the government’s chief troubleshooter. Jaitley did not contest the 2019 Lok Sabha election presumably because of his ill-health.last_img

Nanoparticle boosted Tcells take on cancer

first_img Citation: Nanoparticle boosted T-cells take on cancer (2011, May 5) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-05-nanoparticle-boosted-t-cells-cancer.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. More information: Therapeutic cell engineering with surface-conjugated synthetic nanoparticles, Nature Medicine 16, 1035–1041 (2010) doi:10.1038/nm.2198AbstractA major limitation of cell therapies is the rapid decline in viability and function of the transplanted cells. Here we describe a strategy to enhance cell therapy via the conjugation of adjuvant drug–loaded nanoparticles to the surfaces of therapeutic cells. With this method of providing sustained pseudoautocrine stimulation to donor cells, we elicited marked enhancements in tumor elimination in a model of adoptive T cell therapy for cancer. We also increased the in vivo repopulation rate of hematopoietic stem cell grafts with very low doses of adjuvant drugs that were ineffective when given systemically. This approach is a simple and generalizable strategy to augment cytoreagents while minimizing the systemic side effects of adjuvant drugs. In addition, these results suggest therapeutic cells are promising vectors for actively targeted drug delivery.via Newscienctist Nanoparticle-decorated cells power novel approach to cancer therapy T-cells are a group of white blood cells that works with the body’s immune system. When cancerous cells are found within the body, T-cells swarm around to try and destroy the cancer. However, many tumors will emit a chemical which works to weaken the T-cells, allowing the cancer to continue to grow.Irvine’s team discovered that they were able to attach 100 nanoparticle capsules to a T-cell without affecting its function. The team then filled these capsules with interleukins. Interleukins are naturally made in the immune system and work as system regulators by keeping the T-cells fighting. By adding the additional interleukins, they increase the ability for the T-cells to push forward and attack the cancerous cells.The team then injected these boosted T-cells into mice who were infected with bone and lung cancer. The T-cells immediately swarmed the cancerous cells and were able to stay functional for much longer than the traditional T-cells. In addition, mice treated with regular T-cells died from tumors within a month, while those treated with the boosted cells were had improving health.Because these T-cells are being modified by the nanoparticles, there is no need for them to be genetically modified which is complex and costly. This process also has the potential to speed up clinical trials.center_img (PhysOrg.com) — According to a study in Nature, Darrell Irvine from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and his team members have found a way to boost the natural immune system when it comes to fighting cancer by arming them with interleukin-filled nanoparticles. Explore further © 2010 PhysOrg.comlast_img read more

Researchers identify virus that causes horse hepatitis

first_img Deadly Australian horse virus found in dog Overview of a Theiler’s disease outbreak. Credit: (c) PNAS, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1219217110 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. First identified in 1919, Theiler’s Disease is associated with the use of blood products. Many outbreaks have occurred in North America and Europe after horses received plasma or serum to protect them from contagious diseases, such as anthrax or encephalitis, or toxins, such as botulism or tetanus. Because of this, veterinary researchers have long believed that an infectious agent or toxin that contaminates the blood supply causes the disease. However, nobody had ever identified such a contaminant. Ganem and his colleagues studied horses that contracted Theiler’s Disease after receiving botulinum antitoxin. Out of 17 horses that received the same antitoxin after possible exposure to botulism, 8 developed Theiler’s Disease. To investigate the possibility that a virus in the antitoxin had caused the disease, the team extracted RNA from two of the horses that contracted it and from the antitoxin itself. They used next-generation sequencing to identify a previously unknown virus, which they designated “Theiler’s Disease-associated virus” (TDAV). The researchers found TDAV in all eight horses that developed hepatitis and in the horse, from another farm, that provided the antitoxin. TDAV is a member of the Flaviviridae family of viruses, which also includes the viruses that cause hepatitis C, yellow fever and dengue fever in humans. Amy Kistler, who participated in the research, believes that nobody identified TDAV before because it does not closely resemble any previously known viruses. It shares only 35.3% amino acid identity with its closest relative, a virus known as GB virus D.Horses on the same farm that received a different antitoxin or no antitoxin at all never contracted the disease, indicating that horse-to-horse contact is not a means of transmission.An epidemiological survey of horses on that farm and two other farms also revealed an association between exposure to TDAV-positive antitoxin and development of Theiler’s Disease. The team concedes that further research is required. They have not yet determined where TDAV originates. In addition, TDAV may not be the only cause of Theiler’s Disease; five different viruses cause human hepatitis. More information: Identification of a previously undescribed divergent virus from the Flaviviridae family in an outbreak of equine serum hepatitis, Published online before print March 18, 2013, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1219217110 AbstractTheiler’s disease is an acute hepatitis in horses that is associated with the administration of equine blood products; its etiologic agent has remained unknown for nearly a century. Here, we used massively parallel sequencing to explore samples from a recent Theiler’s disease outbreak. Metatranscriptomic analysis of the short sequence reads identified a 10.5-kb sequence from a previously undescribed virus of the Flaviviridae family, which we designate “Theiler’s disease-associated virus” (TDAV). Phylogenetic analysis clusters TDAV with GB viruses of the recently proposed Pegivirus genus, although it shares only 35.3% amino acid identity with its closest relative, GB virus D. An epidemiological survey of additional horses from three separate locations supports an association between TDAV infection and acute serum hepatitis. Experimental inoculation of horses with TDAV-positive plasma provides evidence that several weeks of viremia preceded liver injury and that liver disease may not be directly related to the level of viremia. Like hepatitis C virus, the best characterized Flaviviridae species known to cause hepatitis, we find TDAV is capable of efficient parenteral transmission, engendering acute and chronic infections associated with a diversity of clinical presentations ranging from subclinical infection to clinical hepatitis. Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciencescenter_img © 2013 Phys.org (Phys.org) —Theiler’s Disease is one of the most common causes of equine hepatitis. Death rates in horses that develop symptoms range between 50 and 90 percent. Although veterinarians have known about Theiler’s Disease for almost 100 years, until now, scientists have been unable to determine its cause. In a paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Donald Ganem and his colleagues at the Novartis Institute for Biomedical Research and Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine report they have identified the virus that probably causes the disease. Citation: Researchers identify virus that causes horse hepatitis (2013, March 19) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-03-virus-horse-hepatitis.html Explore furtherlast_img read more

Researchers find 400 year old Ice Age plants in Arctic able to

first_img Emergent population of Aulacomnium turgidum from beneath the Tear Drop Glacier, Sverdrup Pass, Ellesmere Island, Nunavut. Credit: Catherine La Farge. The research team ventured to the Canadian Arctic Archipelago to see what changes were occurring in the Arctic due to global warming—the Teardrop Glacier on Ellesmere Island in Nunavut, they note, has retreated more than 650 feet over the past several hundred years. Just next to the glacier’s edge, the team found some green growth among clumps of exposed dead plant material that had been under the ice for centuries. Intrigued, they collected some samples and brought them back to their lab for study. Emergent population of Aulacomnium turgidum from beneath the Tear Drop Glacier, Sverdrup Pass, Ellesmere Island, Nunavut. Credit: Catherine La Farge. Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences © 2013 Phys.org Explore further The team put 24 cultures in an ideal environment and found that 11 of them began to grow, representing four distinct taxa. The plants, known as bryophytes—moss, lichen, liverworts, etc—don’t have vascular tissue to pump fluids, a property that helps them survive in very cold climates. Carbon dating of the samples showed that the plants had been living approximately 400 to 615 years ago—a time just before the Little Ice Age (1550-1850). Byrophytes have another property, called totipotency that allows any cell of the plant to reproduce and grow into a whole new plant. The findings dispel the common belief that land exposed by melting glaciers becomes populated by new plant growth exclusively via seeds or spores carried by the wind. Instead, some plants lying frozen beneath the ice are apparently able to survive and begin growing again when the environment changes. This suggests that Earth scientists will have to take a new look at models meant to portray how ecosystems recover from glaciers after they retreat. In vitro culture of Aulacomnium turgidum regenerated from emergent Little Ice Age population beneath the Tear Drop Glacier, Sverdrup Pass, Ellesmere Island, Nunavut. Credit: Catherine La Fargecenter_img More information: “Regeneration of Little Ice Age bryophytes emerging from a polar glacier with implications of totipotency in extreme environments,” by Catherine La Farge, Krista H. Williams, and John H. England. PNAS, 2013. To be available at www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1304199110AbstractAcross the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, widespread ice retreat during the 20th century has sharply accelerated since 2004. In Sverdrup Pass, central Ellesmere Island, rapid glacier retreat is exposing intact plant communities whose radiocarbon dates demonstrate entombment during the Little Ice Age (1550–1850 AD). The exhumed bryophyte assemblages have exceptional structural integrity (i.e., setae, stem structures, leaf hair points) and have remarkable species richness (60 of 144 extant taxa in Sverdrup Pass). Although the populations are often discolored (blackened), some have developed green stem apices or lateral branches suggesting in vivo regrowth. To test their biological viability, Little Ice Age populations emerging from the ice margin were collected for in vitro growth experiments. Our results include a unique successful regeneration of subglacial bryophytes following 400 y of ice entombment. This finding demonstrates the totipotent capacity of bryophytes, the ability of a cell to dedifferentiate into a meristematic state (analogous to stem cells) and develop a new plant. In polar ecosystems, regrowth of bryophyte tissue buried by ice for 400 y significantly expands our understanding of their role in recolonization of polar landscapes (past or present). Regeneration of subglacial bryophytes broadens the concept of Ice Age refugia, traditionally confined to survival of land plants to sites above and beyond glacier margins. Our results emphasize the unrecognized resilience of bryophytes, which are commonly overlooked vis-a-vis their contribution to the establishment, colonization, and maintenance of polar terrestrial ecosystems.Press release How the ice ages ended The researchers note that plants aren’t the only type of life being exposed by melting glaciers—cyanobacteria and green terrestrial algae have also been spotted, some of which haven’t ever been seen before. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Researchers find 400 year old Ice Age plants in Arctic able to grow anew as glaciers retreat (2013, May 28) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-05-year-arctic-anew-glaciers-retreat.html (Phys.org) —A team of researchers from the University of Alberta led by, Catherine La Farge, has found that mosses and liverworts covered by ice over 400 years ago and now exposed due to glacial melting, are able to start growing again. In their paper published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team describes how carbon dating showed the plants to be from a time just prior to the Little Ice Age. Catherine La Farge gets an up-close look at bryophytes uncovered by the retreating Teardrop Glacier on Ellesmere Island in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago.last_img read more

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first_img Videos | AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting … read more Videos | Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, read more Video Player is loading.Mark Ibrahim explains what EPs need from CT imagingPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 5:23Loaded: 3.08%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -5:23 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Video Player is loading.Arthur Agatston explains the history of CT calcium scoring Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 9:54Loaded: 1.67%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -9:54 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Video Player is loading.GE Cardiographe cardiac CT scanner at SCCT19Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:38Loaded: 26.15%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:38 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Videos | Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical pro read more Video Player is loading.Pierre Qian explains radiotherapy to ablate VTPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 7:34Loaded: 2.19%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -7:34 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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News | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 06, 2019 Artificial Intelligence Improves Heart Attack Risk Assessment When used with a common heart scan, machine learning, a type of artificial intelligence (AI), does better than… read more Feature | April 24, 2012 American Lung Association Issues Guidance on CT Lung Cancer Screening Videos | Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McColl… read more Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) read more Related Content Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the… read more April 24, 2012 — Many have read in the news about using low-dose computed tomography (CT) screening to detect lung cancer. And many questions have surfaced: How effective is it? Who should get screened? The American Lung Association (ALA) released new interim guidelines to help physicians, patients and the public in their discussions about lung cancer screening.Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death for both men and women in the United States. The five-year survival rate for lung cancer patients is only 15 percent. Recent research from the National Cancer Institute National Lung Cancer Screening Trial (NLST) found that low-dose CT shows promise as a method for detecting lung cancer in highest risk individuals who have not yet shown symptoms. This method has been shown to reduce deaths by 20 percent compared to use of chest X-rays.Screening recommendationsBased on the NLST findings, the ALA recommends lung cancer screening with low-dose CT scans for people who meet certain criteria, which include the following: current or former smokers (aged 55 to 74 years) with a smoking history of at least 30 pack-years (that is, an average of one pack a day for 30 years) and with no history of lung cancer. The association also emphasizes that only CT scans are recommended and that chest X-rays should not be used for lung cancer screening.ALA recognizes that while low-dose CT scans may save lives, screening for lung cancer should not be recommended for everyone as many known and unknown risks may be associated with both the screening and subsequent medical evaluation.Not smoking is best prevention“Never starting smoking and quitting smoking still remains the best way to prevent lung cancer. People having their homes tested for radon is also important, as radon exposure can increase the risk of lung cancer,” said Norman H. Edelman, M.D., chief medical officer of ALA.The report also recommends that:Patients should be referred to facilities that have experience in conducting low-dose CT scans.These facilities should have multidisciplinary teams that can provide comprehensive follow-up.Hospitals and screening centers should establish ethical policies for advertising and promoting lung cancer CT screening services.The report can be found at www.lung.org/finding-cures/research-news/new-screening-guidelines/lung-cancer-screening.pdf.For more information: www.lung.org FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Sponsored Content | Case Study | Radiation Dose Management | August 13, 2019 The Challenge of Pediatric Radiation Dose Management Radiation dose management is central to child patient safety. Medical imaging plays an increasing role in the accurate… read more Siemens Go.Top CT scanner at SCCT19Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:05Loaded: 15.14%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:05 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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The CT scanner might not come with protocols that are adequate for each hospital situation, so at Phoenix Children’s Hospital they designed their own protocols, said Dianna Bardo, M.D., director of body MR and co-director of the 3D Innovation Lab at Phoenix Children’s. Video Player is loading.Mahadevappa Mahesh discusses trends in medical physics at the 2019 AAPM meetingPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 4:01Loaded: 4.04%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -4:01 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Video Player is loading.Cynthia McCollough explains new advances in CT technologyPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 13:56Loaded: 1.17%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -13:56 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Videos | Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., F read more News | Artificial Intelligence | August 05, 2019 Montefiore Nyack Hospital Uses Aidoc AI to Spot Urgent Conditions Faster Montefiore Nyack Hospital, an acute care hospital in Rockland County, N.Y., announced it is utilizing artificial… read more last_img read more

Netanyahu vows to bring back Israelis held captive in Gaza

first_imgEarlier Friday, the families complained to Israeli media over their treatment by government officials, saying their anguish is being ignored.Netanyahu said Israel is doing everything it can to bring both men home. He met with the Mengistu family in the south of the country on Friday afternoon.“We face a very cruel and cynical enemy that denies the most basic humanitarian duty of returning innocent civilians home to their country,” he said. “We will not relent and will do everything necessary to bring these citizens home.”According to COGAT, the defense body that handles civilian issues with the Palestinians, Mengistu disappeared after he “independently” crossed the border fence and entered Gaza on Sept. 7, two weeks after the end of last summer’s war between the Islamic militant group Hamas and Israel.Israeli media reported he had been distraught at the time of his disappearance.The second man is a Bedouin Arab citizen from southern Israel. Israeli officials have refused to identify him or say how long he had been in Gaza or how he got there. They also would not say which group had him in custody.The case was only allowed to be made public on Thursday — months after the two disappeared — while a gag order is still in place on some of the details surrounding the two men. 5 things to look for when selecting an ophthalmologist Comments   Share   CORRECTS SPELLING OF SECOND NAME TO MENGISTU. The mother of Avraham Mengistu, 28, walks to a family press conference, at the costal city of Ashkelon, Israel, Thursday, July 9, 2015. An Israeli security official said Thursday the Hamas militant group has been holding Mengistu in the Gaza Strip for nearly a year. The Israeli defense body responsible for Palestinian civilian affairs, said Mengistu, born in 1986 from the Israeli city of Ashkelon, independently crossed the border fence into the Gaza Strip in September last year, nearly two weeks after the end of the Israel-Gaza war. (AP Photo/Tsafrir Abayov) Here’s how to repair and patch damaged drywall Israeli officials have in the past said that publicity surrounding cases of missing Israelis makes the process of bringing captives home longer and tougher.For Israelis, captivity of their citizens is an emotionally charged issue. Captured soldier Gilad Schalit was held hostage in Gaza for more than five years, until he was exchanged for more than 1,000 Palestinian prisoners, many involved in bloody attacks against civilians, in 2011.Netanyahu said Thursday he held Hamas, the Islamic militant group which has ruled Gaza since seizing control of the territory in 2007, responsible for the fate of both men. Israel was working to free them and that he had appointed a representative to deal with the matter, he said.But there were no threats of action against Hamas, in contrast to a bruising military campaign that followed Hamas’ capture of Schalit in a 2006 cross-border raid — or more recently, the arrests of scores of Hamas supporters after the deadly abductions of three Israeli teens in the West Bank last year.The teenagers’ slaying by Palestinian gunmen set off a string of events that culminated in a 50-day war that killed more than 2,200 Palestinians in Gaza and 73 people on the Israeli side. It was their third war since the Hamas takeover. Top Stories Ex-FBI agent details raid on Phoenix body donation facility Thousands of Ethiopian Jews live in Israel, many of them secretly airlifted into the country in 1984 and 1990, but their absorption into Israeli society has been difficult. Although they are Jewish, Ethiopian community members complain of discrimination and police harassment.Bedouins make up a small group within Israel’s Arab minority, numbering about 180,000. Some live in organized townships while others still reside in desert tents to stay closer to their nomadic traditions.Earlier Friday, the man identified as a relative of the missing Bedouin told Israel Radio that “nobody is talking to us, this isn’t nice.” The relative’s identity also falls under the same gag order.Another man, only identified by his first name Khaid and said to be someone who knows the Bedouin man well, told Army Radio that the Bedouin had gone missing several times before in Gaza but had been sent back.On Thursday night, Channel 10 TV broadcast a recording of government official Lior Lotan, a Netanyahu negotiator, chastising the Mengistu family for pressing Netanyahu for answers on the case. Lotan apologized publicly on Friday.Mengistu’s uncle, Tzachi Malasa, told Army Radio that he feels his family is being treated badly “because he’s black,” referring to his nephew.center_img Quick workouts for men New Valley school lets students pick career-path academies JERUSALEM (AP) — Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu pledged on Friday to bring back home two Israeli citizens held captive in Gaza as he visited the family of one of the men.Netanyahu’s remarks came a day after Israel’s stunning announcement that two men — Avraham Mengistu, an Israeli of Ethiopian descent, and a Bedouin from Israel’s Arab minority whose identity is still under a gag order — are being held captive in the Gaza Strip. Sponsored Stories Also Friday, opposition leader Isaac Herzog of the Labor Party wrote on his Facebook page that if he was prime minister he would have “embraced the family from the first moment and not waited until pressure from the media and public forces him to make contact.”Copyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Mesa family survives lightning strike to home The vital role family plays in societylast_img read more