Ban calls for maximum restraint following violence along IsraeliSyrian border

Media reports say that Israeli troops opened fire on Sunday as hundreds of protesters from Syria stormed the ceasefire line, in a repeat of demonstrations held last month. Syrian authorities are reporting that 23 people were killed.“The Secretary-General regrets the loss of life, and extends his condolences to the families of the victims,” his spokesperson said in a statement issued last night. “He condemns the use of violence and all actions intended to provoke violence.”The world body said that the UN Disengagement Observer Force (UNDOF) is seeking to confirm facts and help calm a continuing volatile situation in the area.The statement noted that the yesterday’s incident, and a similar one in the Golan last month, puts the long-held ceasefire in jeopardy.Mr. Ban called for maximum restraint on all sides and strict observance of international humanitarian law to ensure protection of civilians. He also reminded the Syrian authorities of their obligation to protect UNDOF personnel and facilities.UNDOF was established in May 1974 following the disengagement of Israeli and Syrian forces after the 1973 war.The unrest along the ceasefire line is taking place as violence continues to escalate within Syria, where the Government continues its crackdown against pro-reform protests that are part of a broader uprising across North Africa and the Middle East. The number of casualties has topped 1,000 since mid-March, with many more injured and thousands arrested. 6 June 2011Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has called for maximum restraint by all sides after yesterday’s violence in the occupied Golan Heights, which reportedly led to an unconfirmed number of civilian casualties, and warned that it threatens the long-held ceasefire between Israel and Syria. read more

Probe launched after man in Canada was attacked because he was a

Perhaps the most jarring part of the ordeal for Ommi is that it happened in Canada.“I am stunned. I am completely helpless,” he said with exasperation.“This is something I never expected. Canada is one of the safest countries in the whole world,” he continued. Toronto police are investigating after a Sri Lankan man said he was followed on his way home from a night shift by two men Sunday morning and assaulted inside Union Station.A new permanent resident, Suresh Ommi immigrated from India and has been in Toronto for just one month. From Monday to Friday, he works at a bank. On weekends, he works the night shift at a grocery store. “I never expected this kind of racial slur.”Toronto police told CBC News they are investigating the alleged assault and will be looking to review any surveillance footage that may have captured it.“These allegations, especially when there’s a racially motivated slant to it, we definitely take very seriously — it is something that will be investigated thoroughly.“It would be investigated thoroughly either way, but [police] do tend to give some extra priority to this because it was possibly racially motivated,” said Const. Craig Brister. Ommi said the man — who he estimates to be around 20 years old — followed up with a threat of violence.Before that happened, a streetcar arrived and Ommi rushed on. He said one of the men followed the streetcar on his bike, but when it descended into Union Station, he figured he was finally safe.“I thought that it was over then and there,” Ommi said. But he said that when he entered the station, he came upon the same man. “He was over here, he was about to assault me,” he said. “I was going to the TTC staff for help and he kicked me in the back.” Ommi said he tried not to pay them any attention, but then one of them eventually approached him.“He came towards me, he got off the bike and came here right in front of my face, and he said, ‘You … Sri Lankan, go back to your country.’” “They just stopped at that point exactly, that point opposite to me, and that guy made a completely inappropriate hand gesture, something like a handgun, and he wants to like shoot me,” Ommi told CBC News. But what began as a bright and beautiful morning is suspected of turning ugly when Ommi was heading home Sunday at 6 a.m. According to Ommi, he was waiting at a streetcar stop on Queens Quay when he saw two men on bikes watching him intently from across the road. read more

Sloveniabased Adria Airways suspends flights lacking cash

LJUBLJANA, Slovenia — Slovenia-based carried Adria Airways says it has suspended all flights for two days due to shortage of funds.The company halted its flights on Tuesday and Wednesday. It says in a statement that the suspension is temporary.Formerly Slovenia’s national carrier, Adria Airways was sold in 2016 to German investment fund 4K Invest. The company has since sold all its planes and is using leased planes.The decision to suspend flights came after repeated delays and cancellations by the cash-strapped carrier. Two of the company’s leased planes have been taken back because of unpaid debt.Adria Aiways said in its statement late on Monday that the company is “intensively seeking solutions in co-operation with a potential investor.” It adds “the goal of everyone involved is to make Adria Airways fly again.”The Associated Press

Column No sweat when it comes to funding new stadiums

The question isn’t whether taxpayers in Arlington, Texas, got hosed when they agreed to spend a half-billion dollars for a new ballpark next door to the one they spent millions to build just 22 years earlier.They did, but in most parts of the country that’s the way the system works. Almost every new stadium or arena comes with a taxpayer price tag so that billionaires who own teams don’t have to dig into their own pockets to pick up the tab.At least in Arlington they went into it willingly. Taxpayers there approved a measure in 2016 for the city to issue $500 million in bonds that will be paid off over the next 30 years with a half-cent of sales tax and hotel and car rental taxes.That will get fans out of the heat and ensure the Texas Rangers remain in the city that also houses AT&T Stadium, also known as Jerry World. Like the Cowboys, the Rangers’ new $1.1 billion stadium — which replaces one that opened in 1994 — has a roof, something noticeably lacking at the ballpark that closes Sunday after a final series against the New York Yankees.Fans in Texas like their sports, and they don’t mind paying. All told they’ve funded two baseball stadiums and one giant football stadium in a quarter century in Arlington alone, all paid for by increased taxes that total $1 billion without inflation, according to Dallas Morning NewsThey’re not alone, of course. Drive down the Las Vegas Strip and there’s a $2 billion stadium going up — partly funded by $750 million in taxpayer money — that will house the Raiders next year along with events too big for the city’s arenas and showrooms.And in Atlanta, two horrible deals to replace football and baseball stadiums that still had the new game smell will end up costing taxpayers a billion dollars or so.The stadium scam has been going on for so long that it’s hard to get terribly excited about it. Team owners and developers know the playbook well, and the saps who actually pay for their edifices usually don’t stand a chance.Contrast that to what’s happening in Los Angeles, where both the politicians and the residents seem to be smarter than the average billionaire.Walk into Dodger Stadium and it’s as beautiful as it was when it opened 57 years ago. To make sure it stays that way the Dodgers are investing $100 million of their own money during the off-season to develop the space behind the outfield into a fan-friendly plaza.Go see a football game at the Coliseum and the place is sparkling, thanks to a $315 million renovation that didn’t require taxpayers to put up a penny. The update even included improvements to the iconic peristyle that looks even better than it did when the stadium opened in 1923.And then there’s the $5 billion project that will open next year in Inglewood as home of the Rams and Chargers as well as restaurants, hotels and a performing arts theatre. It will be the most expensive stadium complex ever and promises to be a stunning addition to the Southern California landscape.And the best thing? Rams owner Stan Kroenke is footing the bill.The same thing is happening up north in San Francisco, where the Warriors will open play this year in the $1.6 billion Chase Center. With no chance of getting taxpayers to chip in, the Warriors are paying for it themselves.I’ll repeat that. They’re paying for it themselves.Yes, it still comes with a price tag, as do the other California projects. But it will be paid by the fans who actually attend games, not by entire populations that might have no interest at all in sports.People in California seem to understand what people in Texas don’t. They’re taxed enough to begin with, and don’t need even more money to come out of their pockets for corporate welfare for wealthy team owners.That’s why the Chargers left San Diego, and why the Raiders are headed for Las Vegas. Unfortunately, there’s a price to be paid for refusing to stand still for a shakedown, and it cost San Diego and Oakland their NFL teams.Down in Texas, meanwhile, they still have all their teams — and soon will have something to show for their giveaway.Next season they can sit at a baseball game and not sweat.____Tim Dahlberg is a national sports columnist for The Associated Press. Write to him at tdahlberg@ap.org or http://twitter.com/timdahlbergTim Dahlberg, The Associated Press read more

Supreme Court judges hear two cases in Winnipeg meet with Indigenous leaders

The meeting with Indigenous leaders will be partly “to discuss what are their main concerns, to understand their difficulties and also to provide them with some answers on how our decisions are made,” Wagner said.It would be “a great thing” to see an Indigenous judge sitting one day on the Supreme Court, he added.“Canadian people should see themselves in their courts and in the Supreme Court. If only for that reason, I would hope that one day we would be able to sit with a colleague of Indigenous origin.”One of the two cases the judges are to hear involves French-language education rights in British Columbia and whether the B.C. government has underfunded francophone schools.The other case centres on how long is a reasonable time in which to try an accused and return with a verdict.In 2016, the Supreme Court said an unreasonable delay is generally presumed should proceedings — from the criminal charge to conclusion of a trial — exceed 18 months in provincial court or 30 months in superior court.In the case to be heard Wednesday, a man accused of sexual offences contends his trial took too long. More than 42 months elapsed from the time police charged him to the judge’s ruling.At issue before the Supreme Court is whether the time a judge takes to consider and deliver a verdict should count toward the limit.Related  WINNIPEG — The Supreme Court of Canada’s decision to hold hearings outside Ottawa for the first time in its 144-year history is part of a plan to let Canadians see how the high court works and strengthen trust in the institution, says Chief Justice Richard Wagner.“It is hard to have faith in something if you don’t understand it. This is why I believe it is so important to see how the justice system works up close and in person,” Wagner said Monday inside a courtroom normally used by the Manitoba Court of Appeal.“Many reasons why there is biases and prejudice in society is the lack of information, is ignorance. So the more you give information to people, the less prejudice and the less bias they will have.”The high court’s nine judges are to hear two cases this week, but much of their time will be spent reaching out to people. They are to meet with Indigenous leaders, members of the francophone community, students at nine schools and the general public. One event is to be an open question-and-answer session at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights.Recent lower court decisions have come under criticism from Indigenous leaders, such as the acquittal of Gerald Stanley in the death of Colton Boushie, a young Indigenous man, on a Saskatchewan farm in 2016, and the acquittal of Raymond Cormier in the death of Indigenous teenager Tina Fontaine, whose body was pulled from a Winnipeg river in 2014. JOHN WOODS / THE CANADIAN PRESS Supreme Court Chief Justice Richard Wagner speaks during a press conference in the Law Courts (Manitoba Court of Appeal) in Winnipeg Monday, September 23, 2019. This is the first time in the history of the Supreme Court that it will sit outside of Ottawa. Gerald Stanley arrives at Battleford Court of Queen’s bench on Jan. 31, 2018, for Day 3 of his second-degree murder trial. He has pleaded not guilty to a second-degree murder charge in the 2016 shooting death of Colten Boushie. Michelle Berg / Saskatoon StarPhoenix Gerald Stanley trial: Jury delivers not guilty verdict in death of Colten Boushie ‘His life mattered’: Colten Boushie remembered by friends, family one year after Gerald Stanley trial ‘I feel like nothing has changed;’ One year after Gerald Stanley’s not-guilty verdict sparked calls for justice reform and reconciliation, people say little has happened FSIN calls for royal commission into Cormier, Stanley verdicts read more

New handball brand – WELCOME OLYMPIAKOS

← Previous Story SHOCK IN QATAR: El Jaish and Lekhwya to merge in DUHAIL Next Story → EHF: 43 teams from 26 countries want to play EHF CL Olympiakos handball The new handball brand coming from Greece where famous sports name – Olympiakos from Athens registered their handball team! Handball-Planet.com wrote two years ago about possibillity that the most popular Greek team join handball world as AEK and PAOK did already in the past.Process of merging with the new champions IEK Xini began, so it is expected that in the new season we have Olympiakos Athens as the name of the team which will compete at Men’s EHF Cup. NEW BIG NAME IN HANDBALL – Greek Olympiakos?

Death toll in Colorado floods rises to four

first_imgAT LEAST FOUR people are now confirmed dead in massive floods in Colorado, which is forcing thousands to evacuate, as well as cutting roads in large parts of the western US state.Some 80 people are also unaccounted for in Boulder County, the hardest hit by “biblical” flash floods which appear set to last for “several days,” according to forecasters.President Barack Obama has signed an Emergency Declaration for the state, and ordered federal aid and resources to bolster state and local efforts.The death toll rose by one Friday, making a toll of three confirmed dead in Boulder County, and one body in Colorado Springs further to the south.“Many communities in our western mountains are completely isolated, no water, no septic, no sewer, we lost every roadway leading to western end of our county,” said Boulder County’s Office of Emergency Management in a Friday afternoon update.“We don’t yet know fully about homes and lives lost in canyons and mountain communities. This will go on for several days,” it added.TV pictures from the devastated region showed roads crumbled into surging rivers, as mud- and debris-filled water poured down from mountainsides along Colorado’s so-called Front Range, a north-sound region where the Rockies meet the Great Plains.Villages cut off temporarily by floodsSeveral mountain towns and villages near Boulder were cut off temporarily by the floods, including Jamestown and Lyons, where as many as 2,500 people were being evacuated.Four helicopters, including three Black Hawk choppers, are being used to ferry rescue personnel and supplies to stranded communities and carry out medical evacuations in the area, where emergency crews are “heavily dependent on air ops due to road conditions.”The “weather has given us a break to do a lot of flights,” it said, adding that some flood waters are receding.But it added: “We have more rain in the forecast; a storm tonight could set us back.”“These communities have all suffered long-term losses. This is going to take a while,” it said, adding that recover efforts would be “long-term and very expensive.”Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper warned that surging waters can be more treacherous than they appear, because they are full of debris and mud.“People try to walk through what looks like a harmless foot or two of water. You have to realize this is like liquid cement and you can be swept away,” he said.- © AFP, 2013Read: Five snowboarders killed in Colorado avalanchelast_img read more

Ireland named the second most generous country in Europe

first_img 37 Comments Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article By Cliodhna Russell http://jrnl.ie/3046263 Tuesday 25 Oct 2016, 10:54 PM Share290 Tweet Email2 THE UK IS the most generous country in Europe, followed by Ireland.The Charities Aid Foundation World Giving Index 2016 found that overall, Myanmar was the most generous country on Earth for the third year running.The United States was second, making it the most generous nation in the western world, followed by Australia.China is named as the least generous country in the poll.The overall table takes financial donations, help offered to strangers and volunteering into account. Image: Shutterstock/M.V. Photography To see a larger image of the table, click here.It found that Iranians and Libyans are the kindest to strangers and people in Myanmar give the most away with 91% giving money to charity.This is the third year in a row that Myanmar, previously known as Burma, has come out at the top of the list. Image: Shutterstock/M.V. Photography Oct 25th 2016, 10:54 PM Short URL Source: Charities Aid Foundation/YouTubeThe index is published one month before #GivingTuesday – 29 November – the global day of giving when people are asked to give their time, money or voice to a good cause.The poll takes into account the responses of 1,000 people on average in each of the 140 countries.Read: Calls for daylight saving time to be scrapped as clocks set to be turned back this weekend> 26,839 Views Ireland named the second most generous country in Europe Myanmar was named the most generous country on Earth for the third year running.last_img read more

People are making a career out of bogus claims TD hits out

first_img Share51 Tweet Email Image: PA Wire/PA Images http://jrnl.ie/3052270 Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article Image: PA Wire/PA Images 70 Comments By Garreth MacNamee INDEPENDENT TD MICHAEL Healy-Rae has said the culture of bogus car insurance claims must be tackled to stop rising premium costs.The Kerry South TD was reacting to a report from S&P Global Ratings, which said motorists could expect a premium hike of up to 15% from the middle of next year.The experts expected insurance prices to slow down to an increase of just 5% in the latter half of 2017.Healy-Rae said: “Measures have to be introduced as soon as possible to tackle this and to stop the culture of bogus claims.“These claims are causing the costs of premiums to rise continuously. Some people are making a career from bogus claims and I would like the insurance companies to examine this situation.”More than one third of Irish drivers have seen their insurance rise by up to 50% in the past 18 months.That’s according to an AA Motor Insurance survey of over 5,000 motorists.It found that the increase is leading people to drive with reduced levels of insurance in an attempt to manage costs.Some 34% of motorists surveyed saw their insurance premiums rise by 20%-50% when compared to 2014, while 30% are spending an extra 20%. Healy Rae has urged the Government to address the issue. Source: Niall Carson/PAHealy-Rae also urged insurance firms to stand up to fraudsters.He added: “The attitude of insurance companies is ridiculous in not challenging claims because it may cost them more to take on the claimant than if they just paid out.“I ask the Taoiseach and his ministers to look at the situation to see if they could bring the insurance companies in to let them know they have to challenges cases if there is local knowledge or proof that a person is involved in a bogus claim.”Luas crash: Eight hospitalised as tram and tourist bus collide in Smithfield >Dutch anti-Islam politician to snub his own hate speech trial > Short URL Friday 28 Oct 2016, 4:14 PM Oct 28th 2016, 4:14 PM 14,236 Views ‘People are making a career out of bogus claims’: TD hits out as car insurance costs set to rise again Michael Healy Rae has hit out over rising insurance premiums last_img read more

Trump administration rewrites the rules with sweeping crackdown on illegal immigrants

first_img Share183 Tweet Email1 THE TRUMP ADMINISTRATION is greatly expanding the number of people living in the US illegally who are considered a priority for deportation, including people arrested for traffic violations, according to agency documents released today.The documents represent a sweeping rewrite of the nation’s immigration enforcement priorities.The Homeland Security Department memos, signed by Secretary John Kelly, lay out that any immigrant living in the United States illegally who has been charged or convicted of any crime — and even those suspected of a crime — will now be an enforcement priority.That could include people arrested for shoplifting or minor traffic offenses.However, categories of illegal immigrants deemed as low priority by the previous Barack Obama administration – generally anyone not tied to a crime – are no longer protected.“With extremely limited exceptions, DHS will not exempt classes or categories of removal aliens from potential enforcement,” the department said. Trump administration rewrites the rules with sweeping crackdown on illegal immigrants Now, illegal immigrants who are suspected of a crime will be a top priority for deportation. Feb 21st 2017, 6:48 PM File photo Image: Charles Reed/U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement via AP By AFP Image: Charles Reed/U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement via AP https://jrnl.ie/3251586 All of those in violation of the immigration laws may be subject to enforcement proceedings, up to and including removal from the United States.Kelly ordered immediate action to begin planning and building a wall along the US southern border with Mexico.He also ordered the hiring of another 5,000 officers for the Customs and Border Protection agency and 10,000 for the Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency.The orders effectively launch into action President Donald Trump’s promise to begin deporting millions of immigrants, mainly from Mexico and Central America, who had been tolerated during the Obama administration as law-abiding, longtime residents.With reporting from the Associated Press© – AFP 2017Read: Trump decries bigotry and intolerance during visit to African American museumRead: Mornings with Donald Trump: Watching TV news and Tweeting non-stop from his unsecured Android 25,745 Views Tuesday 21 Feb 2017, 6:48 PM Short URL File photo 81 Comments Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this articlelast_img read more

US man wrongly linked to burglary after walking dog while black

first_img Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article https://jrnl.ie/4069974 49 Comments US man wrongly linked to burglary after ‘walking dog while black’ The San Diego Sheriff’s Department named Ike Iloputaife as a “person of interest” in the burglary investigation after he was reported while out walking his dogs. Image: Cerovsek Barbara via Shutterstock File photo By AFP A BLACK CALIFORNIAN man who was reported to police by a neighbour while out walking his dogs has become one of the latest victims of apparent racial profiling in the United States.Nigerian-born Ike Iloputaife’s nightmare, which has grabbed headlines, began last month when he took his borzoi (Russian wolfhound) dogs for their daily early-morning walk in his San Diego neighbourhood.A woman took a picture of him, saying he was a “stranger” on her street, and shared it with police following a burglary in the neighbourhood.The photograph was used by the San Diego Sheriff’s Department to identify Iloputaife as a “person of interest” in the burglary investigation.Iloputaife said he was on holiday when the press release bearing his picture was released and was informed by a neighbour that he was a criminal suspect on his return home.“This is my first encounter with law enforcement,” he told the local KPBS radio station in an interview this week recounting his ordeal.“I don’t know how they handle things in general, but they haven’t handled it well in this case.”He added that it was clear the colour of his skin played a key role in him being photographed by a neighbour and then sucked into a criminal probe.‘Color of my skin’“In this person’s head I became a person of interest because of my skin colour,” he wrote on the Nextdoor app, which hosts social networks for neighbours.“Asking to call the police on a black person in this highly charged political and cultural environment can be a danger for the black person.”Iloputaife came to the US in 1981 to study aerospace engineering and ran a bed-and-breakfast in Provence, France, for more than two decades before returning to the US last year.He said although San Diego police have apologised to him for the mishap, he would like authorities to issue a press release to help clear his name.Contacted by AFP, the San Diego Sheriff’s Department said there was no harm intended and that detectives were simply doing their job after the neighbour flagged Iloputaife to police.“While we understand this caused unnecessary strife for Mr Iloputaife, it was not done intentionally nor with any malintent,” the department said in an email.“We are sorry for any strife this may have caused Mr Iloputaife and have begun working on steps to streamline this process to avoid a similar oversight in the future.”The case comes on the heels of several similar racially-charged incidents across the US in which people of colour have been reported to police over seemingly harmless acts.Last month, a white woman called police in Oakland, California, over a black family holding a barbecue in a park, claiming they were using the wrong grill.In April, two black men waiting for a friend were arrested in a Philadelphia Starbucks after a manager at the outlet called the police.A student at Yale University was also interrogated by police in May after a fellow white student found her sleeping in a common room at a dormitory.Such incidents have sparked outrage on social media and prompted various hashtags including “DogWalkingWhileBlack,” “WaitingWhileBlack” and “BBQingWhileBlack”.© – AFP 2018center_img File photo Image: Cerovsek Barbara via Shutterstock Share5 Tweet Email 24,137 Views Thursday 14 Jun 2018, 8:00 AM Short URL Jun 14th 2018, 8:00 AM last_img read more

Foxconn a décidé daugmenter significativement ses salariés

first_imgFoxconn a décidé d’augmenter significativement ses salariésChine – Après le suicide de onze de ses salariés, l’entreprise Foxconn de composants électroniques a décidé d’augmenter les salaires de son personnel de 70%. Le début d’une aire nouvelle pour les ouvriers chinois ?Trente tentatives de suicide dont onze se sont soldées par un décès en cinq mois. Le mal-être des 400.000 salariés de Foxconn n’est plus un secret et la firme chinoise a décidé de réagir en augmentant les salaires de 70%. À lire aussiLe salaire jouerait un rôle inattendu dans la décision de se marierDésormais, un ouvrier travaillant à la chaîne gagnera 243 euros contre 146 actuellement. Ainsi, les heures supplémentaires deviendront “une nécessité” selon la direction de l’entreprise. Une décision qui permet d’éteindre la grogne qui commençait à prendre de l’ampleur. Une nouveauté en Chine. D’ailleurs, des salariés d’autres entreprises ont commencé à manifester leur colère en ce qui concerne les conditions de travail. Quatre usines du constructeur japonais Honda ont été bloquées récemment et le travail n’a repris qu’après l’augmentation de 24% des salaires. Pour apaiser les tensions, les autorités chinoises ont augmenté le salaire minimum dans plusieurs provinces.Le 8 juin 2010 à 13:13 • Emmanuel Perrinlast_img read more

Campaign trail Board of Clark County Commissioners 49th Senate District

first_imgBoard of Clark County Commissioners, District 1: Democrat Ron Barca will be at Bi-Zi Farms, 9504 N.E. 119th St., from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday, June 24, to meet voters and answer questions. For more information go to http://ronbarca4clarkcounty.com.49th Senate District: Eileen Qutub, Republican Senate candidate in the 49th Legislative District, will host a campaign kickoff event at 5:30 p.m. June 26 in the Oak and Elm Room of the Marshall Center, 1009 E. McLoughlin Blvd., Vancouver. The event will include live music, food and beverages. State Sen. Don Benton, R-Vancouver, will emcee the event. There is no cost to attend.last_img

CES 2019 Hyundais walking car concept is perfect for first responders

first_img 2020 Kia Telluride review: Kia’s new SUV has big style and bigger value Now playing: Watch this: 1 1:46 More From Roadshow Hyundai’s Elevate concept can climb a five-foot wall Hyundai started 2019 off right by teasing a concept vehicle that could allegedly walk and climb. Now, Hyundai has brought this concept to CES 2019, and it’s every bit as wild as we hoped.Hyundai used CES 2019 as the backdrop to debut its Elevate walking car concept. While it’s primarily designed to give first responders an additional edge in rescuing people, it can also be used to enhance mobility options for all sorts of citizens. Share your voice CES 2019: Every story so far.Concept cars: Can’t get enough of concept cars? We’ve got you covered. Concept Cars Electric Cars The pictures make it pretty obvious how this car gained the ability to move less like a vehicle and more like a creepy robot animal — while it does have traditional wheels on each corner, they’re connected to the vehicle by way of mechanical “legs.” Those legs have multiple axes of articulation, and since the electric motors that power the concept are in the wheels themselves, there are no powertrain linkages complicating matters.According to Hyundai, the Elevate is capable of driving at highway speeds, but it can also allegedly climb a 5-foot wall, step over a 5-foot gap and have a track width up to 15 feet. So, it’s basically an AT-AT from Star Wars that has, as Hyundai puts it, “both mammalian and reptilian walking gaits.” Enlarge ImageThe model on display at CES is just a 1:8 scale model, sadly, but it’s still absolutely nuts. Angela Lang/CNET “Imagine a car stranded in a snow ditch just 10 feet off the highway being able to walk or climb over the treacherous terrain, back to the road potentially saving its injured passengers,” said David Byron, design manager of Sundberg-Ferar, which worked on the concept, in a statement. “This is the future of vehicular mobility.”The Elevate rides on an electric “skateboard” platform, onto which the body is attached. This gives the concept a little extra flexibility, with bodies that can be removed and swapped out depending on the needs of the moment. To keep things efficient, the legs can cut power to its joints when acting like a normal vehicle. Of course, first responders are the first group I think of when it comes to the Hyundai Elevate. Being able to better traverse rubble and other detritus, which could be the result of a natural disaster, could allow emergency personnel a better chance of saving as many people as possible. But there are other use cases, too — Hyundai has an example image with a New York taxi livery, lifting itself up to make ingress easier for a person in a wheelchair. The sky’s the limit, which I guess makes sense given the concept’s name. Tags CES 2019: Hyundai Elevate is a rescue concept with leggy,… CES 2019 CES 2019 Must-See Hyundai Comment 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous 22 Photos 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better Hyundailast_img read more

Lawmakers want to stop a future filled with smart devices and bad

first_img 1 Now playing: Watch this: Legislation should require basic security standards, like the California internet of things law does, and Geiger also recommended consumer awareness programs, in the same way that energy efficient products have an “Energy Star” sticker on them.”The idea of me telling my mother to go into her router to check for a default password and check and see if it encrypts your personal information, these things are not realistic,” Geiger said. “What I can tell her is, ‘look for a seal, look for a label.'”Michael Bergman, the CTA’s vice president of technology and standards, disagreed with the label approach, telling lawmakers that many people have “label fatigue” when they’re buying technology.The CTA is a trade organization that represents more than 2,000 tech companies, and hosts CES. Bergman said the group has been working on addressing internet of things security concerns, and said that private companies are moving as fast as possible to fix these issues. It’s not fast enough, said Sen. Richard Blumenthal, a Democrat from Connecticut. “There is a tidal wave of anger and alarm building out there, with very good reason,” the senator said to Bergman. “The pace is simply too slow.”Under the current opt-in model, there are no legal penalties for weak security standards, lawmakers pointed out. Blumenthal said that this approach is “failing,” and that lawmakers need to establish standards for companies to follow. While a federal law on internet of things security has been proposed, it hasn’t made much progress. Without a law, security experts warned that the world would be filled with vulnerable devices without fixes. “Unsecured IoT devices will be like the new asbestos,” Geiger said. “We will build them into our environments, only to have to rip them back out years later, and wonder why our predecessors did not have the forethought to ensure basic security from the start.” Comment Politics Smart Home Security Share your voicecenter_img Tags Landlords are making apartments into smart homes, whether… “Internet of things” devices are set to spike in popularity. Lawmakers are worried that they’ll bring security issues, too. James Martin/CNET Before smart devices fill up millions of homes, a Senate hearing on Tuesday looked to figure out how to keep them safe from hackers.”Sound security practices must keep pace with the expansion of the internet of things in order to mitigate these threats,” Sen. Dan Sullivan said in his opening statement. Sullivan, a Republican from Alaska, is chairman of the commerce committee’s subcommittee on security. Lawmakers have attempted to tackle security problems with connected devices through several hearings and proposed laws that would set basic standards for these gadgets. By 2020, analysts expect connected devices to jump up to 20.4 billion units, and security experts warn that without a baseline level of security, this rapid growth will mean a larger risk of cyberattacks.Cyberattacks on smart devices can show results in real time, as hacked Nest Cams are used to blare hoax nuclear attack warnings, and smart TVs are hijacked to promote PewDiePie videos. In other cases, these hacked connected devices are used quietly, as part of massive botnets or cryptomining gadgets.   Connected devices don’t have any regulations requiring basic security measures, but that could be changing. In September, lawmakers in California passed the country’s first internet of things security law, which requires “reasonable” features like ending default passwords on devices. The hearing featured witnesses from the US Chamber of Commerce, the National Institute of Standards and Technology, cybersecurity company Rapid7, the Broadband Association and the Consumer Technology Association.”While IoT holds a promise of revolutionizing the way we live and we work, we should also be wary, because IoT also stands for the internet of threats,” said Sen. Ed Markey, a Democrat from Massachusetts. Harley Geiger, a director of public policy for Rapid7, called on lawmakers to pass a federal law on security standards for smart devices. “There is a tidal wave of anger and alarm building out there, with very good reason.” Sen. Richard Blumenthal 2:46last_img read more

Maximizing Business Profits with CloudBased Apps

first_img This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. Enroll Now for Free There has been an explosion of cloud-based applications and tools for both consumers and business owners, but which ones are best in class? During this 30-minute discussion, business management expert Gene Marks and technology thought leader Maribel Lopez explored the world of today’s cloud-based apps. Watch this informative recording as our guest speakers share their perspectives and recommendations on the following: How collaboration and communication systems can increase profits How office applications can be better employed Social media, document management, CRM, and ERP/financial technologies dominating in the cloud Best devices and hardware for today’s cloud-based workforce Whether a managed services environment for your on-site applications is the right choice for your businessSpeakers Included: Gene Marks Gene owns and operates the Marks Group PC, a highly successful 10-person firm that provides technology and consulting services to small and mid-sized businesses. He has written five books on business management and helps business owners, executives and managers understand the political, economic and technological trends that will affect their companies so they can make profitable decisions. Maribel Lopez Maribel is the principal and founder of Lopez Research, a market research and strategy consulting firm. She’s also the co-founder of the Mobile Research Council, a community of business and technical leaders in Fortune 1000 companies focused on driving innovation and business value. Follow her on Twitter @MaribelLopez Special Guest: Sujan Patel Sujan is an entrepreneur and the VP of marketing at When I Work, an employee scheduling software solution for small businesses. Watch this recording on the best cloud-based apps. May 17, 2016center_img 2 min read Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Nowlast_img read more

Eizo Highlights Latest Flat Panel Display Technology

first_img Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Women’s Health View all 62 items Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 4:09Loaded: 0.00%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -4:09 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Information Technology View all 220 items Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Videos | Flat Panel Displays | December 18, 2014 Eizo Highlights Latest Flat Panel Display Technology Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Conference Coverage View all 396 items Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Find more SCCT news and videos Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicinecenter_img Find more news and videos from AAPM. Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Technology Reports View all 9 items Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Take a tour of Eizo’s products and how they can address key radiology needs during a tour of its booth at RSNA 2014. Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Molecular Imaging View all 22 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Recent Videos View all 606 items Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Find more SCCT news and videos Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Find more SCCT news and videos Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA.last_img read more

Supreme Elections Tribunal official suspended following accusations of ballot theft

first_imgThe Supreme Elections Tribunal (TSE) on Friday said it had suspended an employee for allegedly stealing “a few” ballots prepared for Costa Rica’s presidential runoff on April 6.The TSE did not disclose the name of the suspended official, who was assigned to guard the electoral material. The TSE said it had security footage of the employee “acting suspiciously” at the company where the ballots were printed.The full printing process by private company RR Donnelly was filmed by 32 security cameras. Anyone who entered or exited the facility also was logged into records, the TSE said in a press release.“It was not an action aimed at orchestrating electoral fraud; the conduct displayed by this person does not indicate as such. In addition, only a few ballots were taken,” the TSE said.Last Monday, the TSE denied a report by Diario Extra that ballots had been stolen after an anonymous source on Saturday night sent the newspaper an envelope containing three supposedly original ballots. The ballots contained registry numbers indicating they belonged to polling center No. 4,716, in the provincial capital of Liberia, Guanacaste.The envelope also included a letter claiming that “many others like these are currently circulating throughout the country,” Diario Extra reporter Luis Zárate told The Tico Times.The TSE’s director of the Electoral Registry, Héctor Fernández, on Monday said officials checked ballot bags at that polling station and all ballots were accounted for. “It appears to be a case of counterfeit [ballots],” he said.The TSE said all evidence in the case was sent to the Judicial Investigation Police and the Prosecutor’s Office, which initiated an active criminal investigation.The two candidates on the April 6 ballot are the ruling National Liberation Party’s Johnny Araya and Citizen Action Party’s Luis Guillermo Solís. However, Araya announced last week that he would stop campaigning due to a lack of campaign funds and polling that showed him trailing Solís by a margin of 44 percent. The decision set off a firestorm of criticism in Costa Rican media, and even within Araya’s own political party.Costa Rica’s Constitution prohibits a candidate from dropping out of a presidential runoff race.Recommended: If it looks like a duck and walks like a duck and quacks like a duck… Facebook Comments Related posts:Supreme Elections Tribunal increases security measures for Sunday’s runoff Ex-President Abel Pacheco to back opposition candidate Solís Solís seeks 1 million votes in runoff election to strengthen his mandate Supreme Elections Tribunal dismisses request to reprint ballots for runoff electionlast_img read more

NEW YORK — Brooklyn rapper Tekashi 6ix9ine tehKA

first_img NEW YORK — Brooklyn rapper Tekashi 6ix9ine (teh-KAH’-shee sihks-NEYN’) has pleaded guilty to federal charges, admitting his participation in a violent gang and pledging to co-operate with prosecutors against others.The plea was entered last week by the rapper, whose legal name is Daniel Hernandez. Information pertaining to it was unsealed Friday in Manhattan federal court.During the plea, 6ix9ine said he joined the Nine Trey Blood Gang in the fall of 2017. He says he helped gang members try to kill a rival gang member last March.With the plea deal, 6ix9ine can gain leniency at sentencing from what otherwise would have been a mandatory minimum 47 years in prison if he admits all crimes and testifies truthfully when summoned.A message seeking comment was left for 6is9ine’s lawyers.The Associated Press Rapper 6ix9ine admits gang membership and pleads guilty by The Associated Press Posted Feb 1, 2019 10:07 am PDTcenter_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Emaillast_img read more

Scuffles in north during Newroz celebration

first_imgKurds celebrating the New Year holiday of Newroz in the north clashed with police who ended up arresting eight people, reports said on Monday.The event took place in Trikomo in the presence of a strong police force which carried out checks on people taking part.A ban on songs considered as propaganda and the thorough checks of the participants’ bags and other personal items prompted their reaction.Reports said there were scuffles which resulted in eight arrests. Five were released later on. Three were detained further in connection with possession of banned books. You May LikeDr. Marty ProPower Plus Supplement3 Dangerous Foods People Feed Their Dogs (Without Realizing It)Dr. Marty ProPower Plus SupplementUndoKelley Blue Book10 Electric Cars That Last the LongestKelley Blue BookUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndo Concern over falling tourism numbersUndoPensioner dies after crash on Paphos-Polis roadUndoTurkish Cypriot actions in Varosha ‘a clear violation’ of UN resolutions, Nicosia saysUndoby Taboolaby Taboolalast_img read more